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establish the no-fly zone and suppress his air defences. >> reporter: the secretaries also made clear u.s. policy that moammar qaddafi must go is not the aim of the current mission. >> one of the things that i think is central is you don't, in a military campaign, set as a mission or a goal something you're not sure you can achieve. >> reporter: the critics on capitol hill say the administration's policy lacks clarity. >> i think there should have been a plan for what our objectives were, a debate as to why this was in our vital interest before we committed military forces to libya rd today nato assumed full command of the mission. the president says america's role will be limited. >> we're not putting any ground forces into libya. >> reporter: and that other union heaveal in the middle east like the recent bloody crack down in syria will be looked at case by case. >> each of these, we are looking at and an liz will-- analyzing carefully. but we can't draw some general, sweeping conclusions about the entire region. >> reporter: and president obama makes his pitch monday evening in a telev
. we have lots of things in common with the u.s., fast, generous territory, homogeneous people, hardworking people. we don't have racial problems that affect some african countries or the wars that are waged in europe nor the religious conflict of europe itself. and therefore latin america is called to compromise or rather commitment with its own fate. and therefore we are looking forward to president obama's words. we are all left-handed. we have many coincidences. we studied in harvard, both of us. we are sportsmen. president obama continues to be a basketball player. i was in my time as well. i think the first lady of the u.s. is very good-looking, and president obama has said the same thing about the first lady of chile. there are plenty of 0 coincidences. but the most important one is the one we'll find this afternoon, and modestly if i could suggest to president obama, we hope to have a partnership that is two -- one where we have all responsibilities and not existentialism because it's never been enough. rather a partnership of collaboration between latin america and the
, quote, in the very near future about the u.s. role going forward. the government met with the african union to hammer out a solution. there's violence in other areas of the region as well. in jordan, the associated press reports more than 100 people injured. clashes in ahman were the most i violent in that country in two months of protest. in bahrain, security forces fired tear gas and pellets at anti-government protests. thousands defied a ban on gathering followi ining prayers. and in yemen, the leader says h he's ready to step down, but only if he can leave the government in safe hands. gadhafi is now negotiating. the leaders of tunisia and egypt are already gone. yemen is on the verge of being knocked out, as you heard. these long-running dictatorships are on the ropes. why? because history is changing before our very eyes. there used to be a time when barberism and conquest was par for the course. it was what was expected. the mongols once wiped out a town and destroyed every building, but they also diverted a river that ran through the town. you want to know why? they wanted to
. scuba diving. bill: not new jersey. martha: they are getting out of the u.s., not new jersey. we'll be right back tomorrow, same time same place, see you then. jon: right now breaking developments and brand-new stories this hour. the attack on libya. a ferocious era salt to enforce the no-fly zone and qaddafi's compound among the targets. smoke rises from two damaged reactors. radiation detected in the count three's food and water supply. the 9/11 trials at guantanamo bay, what the lawyers that are set to try the cases are selling faction. how they believe the obama administration may be working to keep these cases out of gitmo. all new, all live "happening now." and good morning to you i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. we're so glad you are with us. we are here in the fox newsroom. happening right now we have a fox news alert out of libya. the u.s. navy releasing grand new video of the punishing nighttime assaults on qaddafi forces. they are using b.-2 stealth bombers, jet fighters and tom hawk missiles. jon: qaddhafi's forces come under fire across the count three. the secur
ruled yemen for 32 years. he is a key u.s. ally in the fight against al qaeda. meanwhile, president obama plans to speak to the nation monday night about libya to explain why he ordered u.s. military action and give an update on the operation. today french and british jets struck libyan artillery and tanks near ajdabiya. smoke could be seen miles away. late today, rebels began a new push to retake the city. and libyan state television showed damage from overnight air strikes in tripoli. nato, which is taking over control of enforcing the no-fly zone, said it's planning for a mission that would last three months. as other nations play a larger role, the u.s. is publicly taking a step back, but it's a small step. more on that from david martin at the pentagon. >> reporter: this is what the battle for libya looks like to a pilot. it's a british pilot attacking a libyan tank. but more than half the 96 strike missions in the past 24 hours were american. and so were all 16 of the tomahawk cruise missiles fired overnight. despite the announcement that nato would soon be taking command of t
at a major u.s. airport, the very same one where an air traffic controller fell asleep on the job. the close call this time around. >> and she said mexican pirates killed her husband while they were jet skiing on a border lake between texas and mexico. now six months later his body hasn't been found, no one has been arrested. the latest on the investigation, plus what she is vowing to do. it's all new, it's all live, it's "happening now". >>> hi everybody. we have a whole lot of ground to cough today. we're so glad you're with us. i'm jenna lee. jon: we do indeed. i'm jon scott. "happening now", nato takes charge of air operations in libya as the fighting intensifies in one strategic oil town. those are antiqaddafi rebels, giving it all they've got, trying to retake control of brega as they come under rocket fire from pro qaddafi forces, the opposition getting hit hard in other parts of the cup as well. jenna: the u.s. considering a plan to arm the rebels, even though nato's chief is opposed to the idea. right now the cia has operatives on the ground in libya. jon: meantime a sign that qadda
on u.s. actions in libya. that speech is scheduled for monday, 7:30 p.m. eastern time. watch it live right here on the fox news channel. >> heather: as we reported at the top of the show we do have new reaction coming to the death of an american pioneer led the way for women and politics, broke that glass ceiling. >> gregg: joining us -- do we have -- apparently we don't. july july with the latest. >> julie: after suffering complications of blood cancer she had battled for 12 years, geraldine ferraro was surrounded by her family when she passed away this morning at massachusetts general hospital. and president obama just moments ago, he says he will forever be remembered as a trail blazer that broke down barriers for women. whether it was at a public school, a teacher, an assistant district attorney, member of congress or candidate for vice president. she fought to uphold the founding ideals of quality and justice and opportunity for all. she leaves behind her husband, three children and eight grandchildren. in a statement her family says geraldine ferraro was widely known as a leade
is recinding his offer to step down by year's end. this as opposition to his regime testifies. they are a key u.s. ally in the fight against al-qaida warns his country is a ticking time bomb that could spiral into civil war without him. a deadly bullet blast killed more than a hundred people. today security forces reportedly fired teargas on some 4,000 demonstrators. in a bid to ease the crisis syrian's president is expected to lift the nearly 50-year state of emergency and move to lift restrictions on civil liberties. the country's emergency laws that gave police almost unlimited power to arrest without arpblgs will be lifted prior to the elections in september. this comes as the interim military rulers says hosni mubarak is under house arrest in egypt. this half he went for medical treatment. gregg: it has been ten days since the military mission began, and the president expected to tell the nation the mission is justified. white house correspondent mike emanuel live in washington with more on that. what else do we know about the case that president obama is going to make tonight? >> reporter:
: secretary of defense robert gates from over the weekend saying libya is not an imminent threat to the u.s. but the director saying the u.s. clearly has an interest there. is that good enough? chuck nash, sir, good morning to you. there was a lot said over the weekend, some view it as conflicts statements, others say no, this gives us greater clarification. take robert gates. what do you make of his comment? >> i think he was spot on. this is not in critical national interest for the united states, however, we do have interests in the region with tunisia on one side and ejit on the other side. bill: hillary clinton said something i thought was a little more -- i thought it was revealing. she said there was no perfect option and i think everybody that looks at this, yeah, that's right, hopefully that's why you took military action. hopefully we'll have a clarification continue. -- tonight. are they split or on the same side? >> i think there was u animinity before this was launched and secretary of state clinton said something else on another network. after isn't gates said no, it's not in
then become the largest class action employment suit in u.s. history. walmart, america's largest private employer, says, no, the class would be too big, the plaintiffs too dissimilar, the issues too many to litigate. the plaintiffs say walmart wants a big company exception to civil rights 0 law. two lower federal courts have ruled the class and case can go forward. that brings us to the supreme court where we now have three women justices, the most ever. cnn's kate bolduan has been following the case for us and joins us to recap the arguments. kate, good to see you. any sign that the women justices were at all receptive to the plaintiffs? >> reporter: that's very interesting. i would say, first off, that it did seem in the courtroom with the aggressive question you did hear from the female justices, that they were receptive to the women's claims to the sides of the plaintiffs. but, as i just said, there are three women on this court. so what it's looking like -- we always have to give it a huge caveat here because of course we never know until the justices rule -- from the commentary and
in the u.s. >>> a killer whale that drowned its trainer, one year ago, today, he is back in the show at sea world. some are asking if it's too soon, or even safe at all. it's all new, all live. it's "happening now". jon: good morning to you! i'm jon scott. jenna: hi everybody, i'm jenna lee. nice to have you back, jon. >>> "happening now", major setbacks in the rebels in libya, proqaddafi forces forcing them to retreat from a key oil town. it's a big story, jon. jon: it's a rapid reversal coming days after the opposition made gains west and trying to take over qaddafi's home town. nato war planes flying over the zones with the heaviest fighting, witnesses reporting hearing explosions indicating a new round of air strikes. jenna: all the chaos is affecting the oil industry. that is the industry in libya. we have word today that only one refinery is still functioning. there are now fears of a fuel shortage in libya. how that fight affect the fight. and also what that means for the rest of the world so dependent on oil now. rick leventhal is traveling to benghazi now, he's going to call us in
the situation in libya as "unique" and said the u.s. intervened militarily to prevent a humanitarian crisis. >> it's true that america cannot use our military wherever repression occurs. and given the costs and risks of intervention, we must always measure our interests against the need for action. but that cannot be an argument for never acting on behalf of what's right. of course, there is no question that libya and the world would be better off with gadhafi out of power. i along with many other world leaders have embraced that goal. and will actively pursue it through non-military means. but broadening our military mission to include regime change would be a mistake. >> and to further that point on regime change, the president said "weapon went down that road in iraq." he also said that history is not on gadhafi's side. he says nato will assume full control of the libyan mission wednesday, and the u.s. will play a supporting role, reducing the risk and the cost of the operation. >>> the president's speech was not enough to satisfy some critics on capitol hill. house speaker john boehner
decades. >> a massive fire at a u.s. major airport, flames raging for hours, the fallout, plus the investigation into what sparked it. >>> and donald trump with his eye on the presidential prize. does he stand a chance? for real? it's all new, all live, it's french fighter jets take action shooting the libyan war plane out of the sky. jenna: as a new round of strikes hits target necessary tripoli, jet bombers and tom hawkmisms from the coalition target qaddafi air defense. jon: rebel forces making real progress now that qaddafi's tanks have pulled back from key strategic cities, the opposition taking more steps to form a government in the east. rick leventhal is streaming live from benghazi. what can you tell us about qaddafi possibly negotiating an exit plan, rick? >> reporter: well, we heard that libra's more than fr called the u.s. assistant secretary of state over the state -- over the weekend to possibly discuss what qaddafi's exit strategy might be. it's pairnl very preliminary, these calls are made all the time is what we're hearing but there may have been a call made fr
. >> of the united nations representative for afghanistan said the u.s.-led surge in the country is working. he spoke and the middle east institute in washington as the u.s. voted to extend its mission by one year. this is 55 minutes. >> he has come from new york where he was talking about afghanistan. i believe the security council is voting today. is that correct? on thursday, he was talking about the u.s. role in afghanistan and its camilla -- commitment to the development of the country. the u.n. plays an important role. there are 34 representatives in afghan provinces. they spent over $1 billion on the country last year. food programs, health services, and infrastructure and development. the afghans are asking to take a greater lead in all aspects of government and development and the efforts to achieve peace. staffan de mistura made it clear that the u.n. takes these calls for sovereignty. seriously. what are the challenges of handing over greater responsibility to the afghan government? how can the u.n. support the process and maintain its commitment to the development of afghanistan? these qu
, living in an economy where there is a u.s. and in the u.s.s.r., what is the role in this adulation? who has access to arms and weapons? for example, what is going on in mexico right now with the house world arms trade? host: we're talking with all of you today. you can call in about your thoughts on the 30th anniversary of the reagan assassination attempt, or you can send as a tweak on twitter. there are the addresses. we are also asking the question on our facebook page. if you want, you can continue that conversation on that side as well. montana on the republican line. caller: i am a republican. host: and you are on the air. caller: high among the republican committee of great falls, montana. i am a republican. hello? host: you have to turn your television down. that is why we're having confusion here. an independent scholar, that morning. caller: i am 27 years old, so i was born about that time. but i went for social studies of that nature. there was a lot of racial disparity, well our clients and all day, to make the majority of white folks look get blacks as lazy, did not want to
traffic control procedures. u.s. transportation secretary ray lahood calling for at least two air traffic controllers now to man overnight shifts. this after a controller at d.c.'s reagan national airport reportedly fell asleep and two planes couldn't get in touch with the tower after mid night just trying to land. both had to go in for a landing on their own. toes your headlines. >> five hour energy ran out and two planes had to do their own thing. >> i'm sure nothing's down there on the runway. let's cross our fingers. let's talk a little bit about what's going on right now. in libya, new video just in, one of qaddafi's bases reportedly destroyed by u.s. coalition air strikes. look at these pictures, showing a flaming wreckage overnight and qaddafi's compound in tripoli also reportedly targeted again and was struck. the commander of britain's royal air force says libya's air force no longer exists. >> so now that we also have an exclusive story that came to us, i think james rosen and jennifer griffin working on this together. essentially, there might be some break as we try to find o
minister resigns. jenna: also new developments in yemen, a key u.s. ally and central battleground against al-qaida, antigovernment demonstrators pouring into a square in the city's capitol calling for an end to the regime and they may just get it. the president there announcing today he will step down on certain conditions. reenaninan is live in jerusalem with more. >> reporter: you know, what we are seeing now just in the past few hours for the very first time the leaders of syria and yemen have decided to send out their own progovernment protestors to match the antigovernment protesters in the street, that's something that hasn't happened yet in the back and forth. in yemen the president announced that he's willing to hand over the reigns of power there but it has to be to someone he approves of. he claims he doesn't want to see his country descend into civil war and he announced that to his supporters today. he has been ruling yemen for more than 30 years, but still thousands of antigovernment protesters continue to take to the streets to defy the government and call for him to resign
is falling against the u.s. dollar, currently trading at 1.407 6. but on the other hand, the dollar is gaining against the british pound and the japanese yen. when it comes to the yen, that's trading at 83.02. and the pound trading at 1.6025. pauline? >>> the weaker yen gave exporters a big boost in the tokyo trading this session. the nikkei reversed several days of losses to become the region's top performer on this wednesday. but tokyo electric power's shares continue to take a beating. they close down 18% for a third straight day. now they're down more than 71% for the year. around the rest of the region, mining and metals companies lift australia's benchmark. bhp billiton and rio tinto gained 2% by the close. and property stocks were the winners after reports. hutchinson alcoa was the best performer up nearly 4%. >>> the nuclear crisis is taking a toll on the company's president. he's hospitalized suffering from fatigue and stress. meantime, the chief executive of tokyo electric power has apologized for the wide range of damage caused by the fukushima daiichi power plant. the na
of america has done what we said we would do. >> ok. so last night, he was talking about my leadership. u.s. led. go back 10 days ago, we didn't hear that. listen to this montage. >> in this effort, the united states is prepared to act as part of an international coalition. american leadership is essential. but that does not mean acting alone. in this effort, the united states is acting with a broad coalition. make no mistake, today we are part of a broad coalition. our goal is focused. our cause is just. and our coalition is strong. >> well, so that's the president as he evolved into this position and i think one of the many columnists who looked to the speech and analyzed the speech and said it best, this is a good speech if he said it 11 days ago, he would have quieted 95% of the critics. i would have found a way to give the secretary of state some credit. >> no kidding. she got him into this thing. >> it's amazing how much stuff you can do if you don't mind who gets the credit. that would have been a perfect time with hillary clinton leading -- secretary of state hillary clinton leadi
. clearly they need help but u.s. defense secretary says countries other than the u.s. can step in with training. robert gates is on capitol hill amid new revelations of cia people gathering facts and cultivating contacts on the battlefield. here's a bit of what he told the house arms services committee. >> i can't speak to any cia activities but i will tell you that the president has been quite clear that in terms of the united states military, there will be no boots on the ground. >> now i want to show you a libyan city that's far from rebel territory but a battleground in every sense. misrata, which we've already mentioned there in yellow. almost from the start of this uprising, misrata has been under siege from government tank, artillery, even snipers. an independent reporting has been all but impossible in fact we don't even know who controls misrata anywhere but cnn's frederik pleitgen managed to enter the city yesterday and when he found, well you will have to see from yourself. fred, joins us from a ship not far from the misrata port. fred, tell us about your odyssey the
was simply that i did not believe that the president had outlined a vital u.s. american interest in our engagement in libya, that the united states cannot afford to be the police force of the wor world. this week, with the president's address to the nation, i had hoped that i would hear something to change my mind, or, better yet, something that would instill confidence about the president's decision, but unfortunately, this address provided the american people with many more questions than answers. president obama left me wondering why any vital u.s. american interest in libya would justify military action. he said refugees would stream into tunisia and egypt, but we often aid refugees without f-15's. he said we needed to preserve the writ of the united nations security council, but he did not explain why the safety of our men and women in uniform should ever be put at the service of that body. he said that we needed to show dictators across the region that they could not use violence to cling to power. but if president obama's policy fails to get rid of qaddafi, that iqaddafi,that --
is one of the most important countries in the region and it has great implications for u.s. national security and with regard to israel, very important place. the fact that those people are rising up is much more difficult to rise up in syria and come out to the streets of syria than in egypt so this is a major shift. i remember asking secretary gates about this when we were traveling to afghanistan just two weeks ago. i said why haven't we seen protests in syria and he said because the assad rejamie -- regime would kill those people so there are a lot of raised eyebrows to see the syrian people are protesting. >>shepard: and i would say that washington was probably caught off guard and the people were blown away by this. this was leaked, the message to the president in advance was "reform begins now." a 48 year police state was about to evaporate and when it did not happen in the south of the country they started to rise up again and we are either going to see the military back down or we are going to see the military kill them. >>jonathan: far more likely in this situation we are g
's forces driving the opposition fighters back from their earlier gains and now the u.s. and its allies still not ruling out the possibility of arming the rebels. where are we now? good morning, everybody, welcome here, i'm bill hemmer live in "america's newsroom". how you doing martha? martha: doing well, bill, good to see you, folks. there's a lot going on. i'm martha maccallum. as you can see, there's heavy fire in the town of ras lanuf, a town the rebels thought they had taken back, now they fight a wave of nato air strikes, forces loyal to qaddafi once again back on the advance and putting the rebels in a very tough situation, pinned down by huge rockets, qaddafi's mob said to be closing in once again. bill: rec leventhal, leading our coverage, he has moved to the east of ras lanuf and what that is happened in this battle, rick? >> reporter: good morning, bill and martha. we just lost power in adjabiya, this town fell to qaddafi troops, regained by the rebels and could be taken over once again by qaddafi's troops. they have been striking rebel positions west of us in the town of ra
targeted a libyan airfield sunday and other u.s., british and french planes attacked moammar gadhafi's ground troops near the opposition strong hold of benghazi. >> we now have the capability to patrol the airspace over lybia and we are doing just that into a more consistent air presence. the no fly zone is effectively in place. >> reporter: rebels in benghazi welcome the international military actions against gadhafi forces. some of them danced on destroyed tanks. the u.s. and other coalition countries launched the military operation yesterday after the united nations authorized all necessary measures to protect civilians in the northern african country. >> we have seen the people of lybia take a courageous stand against a regime determined to brutalize its own citizens. >> reporter: u.s. officials say there have been no reports of civilian casualties, but today the head of the arab league criticized the international mission saying the strikes have gone beyond what the league had supported. >> translator: what happened differs from the no fly zone objectives. what we want is protec
said in a potential intervention would come with regret. u.s. and allied forces meeting in paris to talk about potential military action. president obama said yesterday that the united states will take part in a no-flight effort. -- no-fly effort. we want to get your thoughts on the u.s. joined the no-fly effort. here is how you can contribute this morning. here iare the numbers at the bottom of your screen. the president announcing yesterday in a statement about the united states supporting a no-fly zone. this has been done by several allies. we will take a look at the headlines on "washington journal" this morning. mr. obama sketched out an american military role. -- rule. you have probably seen other headlines this morning as well. meetings are going on to talk about the strategy with the united states and other allied forces. the president made the statement yesterday about joining the no- fly zone effort. he spoke about what the united states will not do. here is what he had to say. >> i want to be clear about what we will not be doing. the united states is not going to depl
on "good morning america" and appeared to be suggesting that the u.s. is considering a request to arm the rebel opposition. some members of the coalition are pushing for this, but there are open questions about who the opposition is. i asked a pentagon official just that yesterday. >> we're not talking with the opposition. we have -- we would like a much better understanding of the opposition. we don't have it. so, yes, it does matter to us, and we're trying to fill in those knowledge gaps. >> reporter: that includes questions about towns in eastern libya, which have a history of anti-american activity and have served as recruiting zones in towns like darnah. in april, 2008, a massive intelligence find in northern iraq showed 19% of the suicide bombers in iraq came from darnah, libya. "newsweek" did a cover story on this in april, 2008, focusing on darnah and the recruitment by al-qaeda of suicide bombers in the libyan town. we've asked the state department about it and have been told that they're not doing interviews on the issue of the opposition at this point in time. megyn? megyn:
takeover. the international military mission over libya moves into a new command. >> the u.s. military is scaling back in this aggressive effort today. it is wednesday, march 30th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> good morning, i'm peggy bunker. >> and i'm rob nelson. >>> as opposition forces continue to gain ground against the gadhafi regime, secretary of state hillary clinton is meeting with other international leaders to look for diplomatic ways to deal with the ongoing unrest. >>> also coming up, a huge discrimination suit against walmart goes before the supreme court. we're going to tell you about that and also take a look at the employers who are getting praised for the treatment of women on their work force. >>> you can't make this up, folks, the story of the day here. it's a police pursuit involving a suspect on a bicycle and cops trailing the guy in a golf cart and on horseback. >> reaching speeds of 10 and 12 miles an hour. >> it was a scene out of "die hard". >> oh, boy. >>> but before all that, the u.s. gives up the military lead in libya to nato,
the nation. saying u.s. role in attacking moammar gadhafi forces is limited, but necessary. >> i refuse to wait for the images of slaughter in mass graves before taking action. >> gadhafi is still clinging to power and many question whether the u.s. and its allies are doing enough to push him out. we will talk with tu.s. baee ambassador to the u.n. and john mccain. >>> the snake hunt. the venomous cobra that escaped from the bronx zoo remains on loose this morning creating a media frenzy and inspiring a legion of twitter followers "early" this tuesday morning, march 29th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good tuesday morning. i'm erica hill. >> i'm chris wragge. welcome back to the country. the time zone, the program. >> nice to be back sitting next to you, chris. >>> things were busy while i was away. >>> more on the president speech's last night and that ongoing battle for libya. this morning, rebel forces are macing more resistance from gadhafi militias. a state department diplomat is going to benghazi and meet with rebel leaders for the first time. in the meantime, secretary of st
all of this is. on the heels of a nuclear prices in japan, south carolina here in the u.s. went to court demanding that the nuclear regulatory commission provide a permanent place to store america's waste. there are 104 operating reactors, they're scattered across 65 plants in 31 different states. if you take a look at this map, this gives you a better idea of exactly where this 63 thousand tons of spent fuel, the darker the color of the state, the more radioactive waste that state has, according to the nrc. again, we're talking about 63,000 tons of spent fuel. if you take a look, with the telestrator working, illinois is the state with most, 776 tons. coming in second place is pennsylvania. as we know, pennsylvania, the site of three mile island, the nuclear site that had zadisaste back in the late '80s. and 3,700 tons of spent fuel. pretty much a tie with north carolina and south carolina here. let me show you a map quickly that illustrates what we're talking about when we say spent fuel. these are the spent fuel pools. they're steel-lined concrete pools filled with water like
that president obama is a strong commander. >> according to rasmussen 45% of americans do not believe the u.s.. should get in a conflict for humidity obligations alone. this goes to american exceptionalism. my newspaper column talked about the u.s.a. as a noble nation. for decades we have tried to do the right thing around the world. now we're nearly bankrupt. clearly we request not take wars on like iraq. but an american president should be able to persuade the nation that confronting evil is a worthy endeavor. it's not all about us. if we can save lives without damaging our own country we should do so. but president obama has not been able to make that case. so far his main focus is shifting the humanitarian responsibilities on to other countries. that is okay. we need all the allies we can get but if america is an exceptional countries our leaders have to have that mind set. does president obama? you make the call. that is memo. now for the top story, let's bring in two generals to analyze whether president obama is doing the job as commander in chief. joining us is paul eaton, spent 30 ye
to you at home for staying with us for the next hour as well. the u.s. handed over military operations in libya to nato today, sort of. the president of yemen offered to step down today, sort of. the government of canada was toled today, srt f, and pastte ecuin much larger area around the busted nuclear reactors today, sort of. it was a day of huge headlines, with equally huge devils in the details of all of these big stories. but we're going to start with u.s. politics, where we don't really do details. we tend to like things blunt and simple. case in point. there is a magic word in washington politics. the well earned common wisdom about this word is that if you attach this special magic word to a proposal to something the government could spend money on, doesn't matter how bad an idea it is, how many smart people think it is a stupid thing, if it has this magic word attached to it, it becomes politically invincible, can't be killed. the magic word is defense. and it is well earned common wisdom in washington that any spending that is labeled "defense" is pretty much untouchable spen
.p.a. regs hanging over their head. the regulatory flexibility act. shaded areas indicate u.s. you is session. the 2009 research -- that's the word i can't read, organizations. look at how this is. this is what's happening from regulations. it's going up. on the unemployment scale. the r.e.f. requires the federal agencies to assess the economic impact on small business, we talked about that. to come up with alternatives because unemployment rates are around or above 9% for the past 22 months, it's time that we make these regulations be assessed and seven out of 10 of the new jobs are created by these small businesses. when you hear us talk about the pesticide act, it's very clear, there's the folks that are dealing with it right there. the farmers of america. and it's duplicative. that means they already have a permit that allows them to put out these pesticides and because of this ruling they're having to make -- get another permit at another cost and meet other guidelines for these pesticides. the sixth circuit, we think with this, made a bad ruling and these higher costs to producers and c
are routine, about once a month, and that realistically, killing a u.s. agent along the border is bad for business. it makes it more difficult to get your load across and make money because you get more agents, money, resources. having said that, this is the reality that these guys are dealing with. megyn? megyn: thank you, william. this report is one day after the homeland security department announced a $5 million reward in the shooting of jaime zapata last month. they were ambushed last month in mexico. zapata and his partner were shot several times. zapata died of his injuries. they were there to help the mexican government with its drug war. some arrests have been made, but the investigation is ongoing. this is another extreme weather alert for you, as we watch the storms moving across florida. mother nature is playing a cruel april fools joke on the snow-weary northeast. look at that pink. powerful storm developing. forecasters warn that it will intensify bringing strong winds and heavy, wet snow along the east coast. they're warning folks to prepare for power outages and major
. in the u.s., they're not concerned so they lobby in a different direction. >> thank you. i will ask one more question. this is my second round. if you fast forward to today and look at the other end of the buchan, march 4, 2011, problems we have now, the chair has described moral hazard and the like. we talked about that. what did you do? i can anticipate your answers as i think you've given them, just to make it very clear on the record, what would you recommend march 4, 2011? >> briefly, first, i want to emphasize the things we have said. one, you need more capital. and that you need increasing capital has to be with the size of the bank's, the risk of too big to fail. it has to be that this distortion has to be eliminated. secondly, if you have a problem, you should play by the ordinary rules of capitalism. when you go into bankruptcy, you convert that to equity. it is really a version of the standard rules of capitalism. you look at the numbers back in citibank, they had enough long- term capital it was more than enough to manage them, more than we put in. the answer -- the resoluti
even though libya is not vital to u.s. interests? that's the question. joining us now, dick morris, former advisor to president clinton and the author of the new book "revolt." all right. that's the question for you. >> well, i think that -- i wrote this in a column on my web site dickmorris.com. this guy is playing checkers when he should be playing chess. he's moving the pieces one at a time without thinking five moves down the road. so ok, we're intervening from the air to protect civilians from mass slaughter. all right, that's good right now. now, what happens if we can't get rid of qaddafi and he continues to slaughter the people? you're going to send in ground troops or just say, ok, now we'll turn a blind eye. let's say we get rid of qaddafi and then an iraq style civil war breaks out where his cronies and political party goes underground challenging the rebels with ongoing terrorist tactics like happened in iraq. are we going to turn a blind eye to that? at what point do you disengage. at what point do the libyan rebels take over and turn out to be heavily infiltrated by a
need the assistance of the u.s. and coalition forces in order to push back the advances of the libyan government troops, in particular when they were making the major advancement on benghazi, which officials here said would have cost the lives of tens of thousands of innocent civilians. will they need to be armed now in order to push gadhafi out? well, the president yesterday in one of those sit-down interviews again saying they're not ruling anything out or ruling anything in, but he said that question is being assessed. take a listen. >> one of the questions that we want to answer is, do we start getting to a stage where gadhafi's forces are sufficiently degraded where it may not be necessary to arm opposition groups, but we're not taking anything off the table at this point. >> reporter: now, aides here at the white house seem to feel that it there is progress being made there because of the pressure that's being applied in this phase two of the operation there, which is now being led by nato, brooke. >> because of the pressure being we know time is of the essence. so how long woul
questions on capitol hill right now. some senators say the u.s. should rethink the wisdom of having nuclear plants in vulnerable or densely populated areas. >>> president obama says japan and libya show america's energy security is at the mercy of world events. he says americans demand alternatives when energy prices shoot up, but they also go into a trance and ignore the problem when prices fall. >> when i was elected to this office, america imported 11 million barrels of oil a day. by a little more than a decade from now, we will have cut that by one-third. >>> investigate fors in alabama are looking into the deaths of nine hospital patients. all received ivs contaminated by bacteria. ten other patients got the ivs and reportedly are not doing well. a company sold the iv bags at six hospitals and says the bags have now been recalled. >>> after weeks of violent protests in the streets. syria's president addressed his parliament today. mohammad, we have been watching here what is taking place, we have seen some brutal crackdowns by the security forces on the streets of syria, and reports to
that the u.s. finally got involved. the majority of americans believe that was the right move. i said last week, you can't criticize the president on that. it's the timing. it's the timing of this issue and then what was the full fledged mission down the road. and you start adding up now the costs, this is what i think is going to wake up america. do you know that already, this has cost us $1 billion? each one of those tomahawk missiles, 140 of them ohave bee used. $30 million a piece. that f-15 that crash landed $30 million. what about the united states starts arming the rebel? we're talking about billions of dollars here. we have an economic crisis on the home front. >> let's talk about somebody else. is there any doubt in our foreign policy when you look at people that are thorns in our side, it's iran and syria. for some reason, this administration has looked at the eye doctors and said he's a reformer. he's going to bring change. i can't see any change that's good. hezbollah has been financed. hamas has been financed. their allegiance with iran has never been stronger. now, something
, there will be a debate over it if the u.s. does decide to do it. when you send weapons you have to send more than just weapons but trainers, as well, so it is a sign of increased involvement and officer what we have seen how the rebels fight and fire and thousand they drive back and forth and how they behave there will not be a rapid turn around. >>neil: be safe. in the meantime they attack our human rights record and now we are saying sinus up again reapplying for the second term on the u.n. human rights council, the council that wanted syria in and only recently kicked libya out. and now the foundation for the defense of democracy is trying to figure that one out. i don't know if i would like to be in that club. >>guest: you are, we are paying for the biggest share. >>neil: why are we so eager to be in the group that we were despising. >>guest: hope over experience? the policy of this administration is to try to engage with some of the worst of the worst and believe me at the human rights council that is where though gather. want to engage with the human rights abusers, that is a place to go. the id
that the majority of the u.s. segment was brought up a piece by piece. it will be truly amazing. >> congratulations on a successful mission. the question will be for someone who wants to tackle it. i do not think people on the ground can appreciate what the living spaces are like in the space station. now that it is complete can you talk a little bit about how large it is and how much space you had to move around in? >> just to start off, this space station is the largest pressurized volume in place in history -- in space in the history. i use the word that my son uses, which isginormous -- is g inormous. it is equivalent to a seventh 47 or bigger. it is oppressive -- a 747 or better. we can use every single one of the walls or models in a way that we cannot do on the ground. it makes for a wonderful resource for science and living and being up here floating around. it is great. >> i have a question about garbage, literally. how much trash does the iss generate? where do you put it and do you recycle? >> we do recycle certain things. we recycle our water and -- our urine and turned it into water. t
tomorrow. .. with u.s. comptroller general jean dodaro. it pinpointed 34 areas from defense and job training to social services and safety for federal agencies have redundant programs. this is two hours and ten minutes. >> good morning. the committee meeting will come to order. >> as is the new tradition of this committee, we will begin by reading the oversight mission statement. we exist to secure to fundamental principles. first, americans have a right to know their money washington spends and takes is well spent and second, americans deserve an efficient, effective government that works for them. our duty on the oversight and government reform committee is to protect these rights. our solemn responsibility is to hold government accountable to tax payers because taxpayers have a right to know what they get from their government. we will work tigers tirelessly with citizen watchdogs to deliver the facts to the american people and bring genuine reform to the federal bureaucracy. this is the mission of the oversight and government reform committee to read today's hearing is the secon
to exercise command over the ground forces. in a briefing at the pentagon, they also said u.s. forces were preparing to hand off control of the no-fly zone to the nato command, but will will -- will remain responsible for air strikes to protect civilians. >> western warplanes launched a seventh day of air strikes against muammar gaddafi's air forces. encouraged by the raid, the opposition hopes to retake the city soon. >> maybe today or tomorrow. [unintelligible] >> in the rebel stronghold, the imam thanks coalition forces for intervening. these photos show victims of the fighting from the rebels' side. >> [inaudible] >> it is unclear how many libyans have died in the conflict. >> japan's nuclear safety agency says it is likely the radioactive material is leaking from part of the number 3 reactor. officials don't think the reactor has cracked but the radioactive material is leaking from somewhere inside. earlier today the japanese prime minister warned the situation is nowhere near being resolved. >> the latest footage of the plant released by the japanese military. radiation and water at
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